Real Estate

What It Means to Be “Judgement-Proof”

What It Means to Be “Judgement-Proof”

Prior to the establishment of the United States, people in England who did not pay their debts were sent to debtor's prison. Today, in the United States, there is no debtor’s prison and creditors can only enforce judgments if they can locate the assets of the judgement debtor, and have them sold to liquidate the debt or by garnishing their wages. If a debtor truly has no job or assets, he is said to be “judgement proof” because a judgment creditor has nothing to sell or garnish. Many debtors, however, merely pretend to be judgement proof! They really do have assets, but attempt to hide them. 

Payoff Letters: The Newest FDCPA Landmines

Payoff Letters: The Newest FDCPA Landmines

On December 3, 2015, the United States Court of Appeals, 11th Circuit, decided the case of Kevin Prescott v. Seterus, Inc., 635 Fed. Appx. 640, 2015 U.S. App. LEXIS 20934 (11th Cir. Fla. 2015) and held that the inclusion of estimates or anticipated costs that have not yet been incurred, in a payoff or reinstatement letter, is a violation of the FDCPA

Loss Mitigation Prohibitions - It Ain’t Just Loan Mods

Loss Mitigation Prohibitions - It Ain’t Just Loan Mods

Many loan servicers are under the misimpression that the prohibition against dual tracking only applies to loan modifications. This is incorrect; it also applies to forbearance agreements, deeds in lieu of foreclosures and short sales.